VANCOUVER SUN: COQUITLAM'S BRIDLEWOOD NESTLED BETWEEN MOUNTAINS AND AMENITIES


Finding the right balance between urban amenities and access to the great outdoors can be a challenge when choosing a neighbourhood to live in; however, many people are finding exactly what they need in the Coquitlam community of Burke Mountain.

It’s an area still growing and developing into itself, with plans made for the construction of a new elementary, middle, and secondary school, all to support the future population of students. A boom is expected based on all of the residential developments in the works. Drive around on any given day and it’s not hard to spot signs advertising a long list of projects.

Monique Janower, senior vice-president of marketing for Polygon, says the company’s Bridlewood project is set apart from the others in the region because of its location.

“This is a beautiful private enclave that’s tucked away, but you’re getting a secluded natural setting that’s only five minutes away from downtown Coquitlam,” she says.

That means ready access to the amenities of Coquitlam Centre and Coquitlam Town Centre, including large-scale retailers, grocery stores, restaurants, and banking and other services. Transit commuters can use the West Coast Express and SkyTrain to get to other points in the Lower Mainland, while the Evergreen Line will make that process even easier in the future.

There are already a number of elementary and secondary schools within proximity to Burke Mountain, even before the neighbourhood schools are built; the David Lam campus of Douglas College is a short distance away from Bridlewood for post-secondary students.

All that having been said, nature is never more than a moment away.

West Smiling Creek demarcates one side of the development, while another creek forms a natural boundary on the other side. Mature trees on the property help reinforce the feeling of a forest glen. Prospective purchasers can already get a sense of what the entirety of the project will feel like on their first visit to the sales centre; some of the homes are already standing. Paved pathways wind between them, and some common areas are already landscaped.

“The trailhead for accessing the Burke Mountain trail system — 37 kilometres of trails in all — is literally right here at Bridlewood,” points out Janower.

“That means lots of mountain biking and hiking for people who love the outdoors.”

When it came time to design the homes, Polygon decided to offer several different floor plans and layouts to appeal to different types of consumers. Janower reports young families — who may be outgrowing their condos — are moving up by purchasing the three-bedroom homes at Bridlewood.

On the lower level of the three-bedroom show home, a tandem garage offers space for vehicles and a workshop area, as well as room to store tricycles, wagons and bike trailers.

The main floor situates the kitchen in the middle of the length of the home, allowing for clear sight lines to both the living and dining areas during the busy dinner prep period. Odds and ends can be tucked away in a pantry, while a powder room is discreetly located in one corner. Double doors open up to a patio for indoor-outdoor dining in the warmer months. A raised yard in the show home demonstrates a unique opportunity for both privacy and to reinforce the feeling of a single-family home; it can be accessed directly from the street, but visitors must go up several steps and proceed through the yard before reaching an entryway.

All three bedrooms are on the top floor, with the two smaller bedrooms on one end; they share access to a bathroom. A laundry closet, with some space for storing linens, is on this floor as well, making it easy to throw a load in the washer or dryer whenever a spare moment presents itself in the busy routines of a young family.

The master bedroom suite offers more space than you might expect for a home of this size: a full wall of closets lines one side, while the ensuite bathroom includes a double sink vanity, tub and separate shower enclosure.

“The four-bedroom homes have been popular with downsizers, who still want a fair bit of space but no longer need a four- to five-thousand-square-foot-house,” Janower explains. “They also don’t want to do all of the maintenance a single-family home requires anymore.”

The front door of the four-bedroom show suite opens up into a double-height foyer, made to appear all the more spacious by a long glass panel running the length of the stairs, in lieu of a standard railing.

The kitchen is a match for many to be found in a single-family house, creating plenty of room for cooking before guests arrive, and for free circulation around the island and into the adjoining living area once the party begins in earnest. A fireplace inset into the wall is sure to warm up the space even in the winter. The side-by-side garage is also on this floor.

On the lower floor, a guest bedroom is separated from a family room by a full bathroom; alternatively, one of the rooms could be configured to serve as a home office. An enclosed yard runs the full length of the home.

On the top floor, the master bedroom is positioned in one corner, with a walk-in closet on one side and a full ensuite bathroom on the other; that provides more separation and privacy from the two other bedrooms on this level. A side-by-side washer and dryer are also on this floor.

The alternate four-bedroom plan has the garage and spare bedroom on the lowest floor, as well as a laundry room and full bathroom. The main floor is laid out slightly differently, as well, with a dining and living area in the front of the home, a short hallway and powder room in the centre of the space, and then a family room, kitchen, nook, and patio at the back. The top floor has the two smaller bedrooms side by side at one end of the home, and the master bedroom suite on the other, with all of the bedroom doors opening on to a central point by the stairs.

Formwerks Architects chose to go with a Craftsman-style look for the exteriors, with gabled roofs, brick-accented facades and cedar shingles. It’s in keeping with some of the more traditional houses in the surrounding neighbourhood, saving the contemporary touches for the interiors of the homes. The individuality of the townhouses has been reinforced with picket fencing for each home, separate entry gates, and custom-coloured front doors.

To date, much of the interest has come from people already living in the Tri-Cities, with some purchasers venturing out from Burnaby and North Vancouver. Janower says the first phase of homes has sold out, and that half of the homes made available in phase two have already been snapped up since mid-May.

Source: The Vancouver Sun

Community: